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May 10, 2021

By: SA Explorer

Five must-do’s while traveling in Tulum

Want to immerse yourself in the sought-after sanctuary of Tulum? Look no further for an unparalleled experience of unique accommodations, eco-conscious restaurants, nature adventures, and holistic centers. This golden gem nestled in the Yucatán is a favorite for everyone, from the spiritual yogi to the digital nomad.

 

1) Stay in a panoramic jungle pod

Tucked in the neighborhood of La Veleta, sits an array of panoramic jungle pods equipped with a 180-degree view of the Mayan jungle. Upon waking, native butterflies will be flying about, and an outdoor limestone rain shower will have you bathing next to palm plants. These unique jungle accommodations offer an intimate connection to tropical wildlife, away from the bustle of town. The neighborhood is surrounded by Holistika, a best-known wellness center, and a short bike ride away from a popular organic supermarket, Gypsea Market.

 

Wake up in the Mayan jungle. (Photo: Chris Abney)


2) Dive in the turquoise waters of Casa Cenote

Located in Tankah Bay sits a cenote connected to the Caribbean sea, the only one of its kind. Casa Cenote is a mix of both freshwater and saltwater, offering an array of diverse wildlife. You also may spot an inhabitant who swims amongst the mangroves, better known as the famous crocodile “Panchito.” One can partake in an array of water activities here, but we’d recommend arranging a private guide with SA to explore the depths of the cenote. A destination expert will happily arrange the entire experience for you, and for a peek at the marvels that await when you choose to book, check out Tulum Breathtaking.

 

Dive in Casa Cenote with a local guide. (Photo: Simon Pallard) 


3) Spend a day at Holistika

In a hidden corner of the jungle, equipped with yoga, breathwork, meditation, ecstatic dance, temazcal, and cacao ceremonies, resides Holistika – one of Tulum’s most beloved wellness centers. You can grab a fresh smoothie bowl at cafe Tierra before venturing into a self-led art walk through the jungle, sprinkled with sculptures and installations by local artists. Holistika offers myriad experiences, making you want to return time and time again.

 

Catch a yoga class at Holistika.  (Photo: Gleren Meneghin)


4) Catch a bite at a consciously crafted food van

Lief’s Vegan Van began by Thomas and Fem, a Dutch couple who sought to create a sustainable and environmentally conscious food van. Located on the way to the beach, you can’t miss the bright sea-green van serving warm banana bread and everyone’s favorite – coconut whipped coffee. This farm-to-table restaurant creates every single meal with miraculous intention and cultivates the highest quality ingredients for their guests. This beachy and picturesque atmosphere with its vibrant cruelty-free ingredients served on artisan wooden plates welcomes in passing visitors, travel influencers, and returning locals alike.

 

Stop at Lief’s Vegan Van for a bite to eat. (Photo: Gilberto Olimpio)


5) Bike Path to the Beach

Tucked in the corner of the Centro lives KuKulKan, a road newly open to the public and named after the serpent deity worshipped by the Mayan people. This road is a breath of fresh air for getting to the beach, compared to the jammed-packed alternative. Take a stroll with your bike down this new scenic route, and cut down massively on travel time, leaving more time to explore the magic of the land. 

Ride your bike down the new road to the beach. (Photo: Austin Distel)

 

If you want to discover the natural wonders of Tulum, speak to a Destination Expert about crafting an itinerary that ticks all your destination boxes. Or, if you are looking for a longer Yucatán venture, check out our popular 7-day Chichen Itza to Tulum tour for an immersion into ancient Mayan Civilization.

 

About the author: Paige Otis is a freelance copywriter and a digital nomad currently residing in the heart of Tulum. She holds a BA in Advertising from the School of Journalism and Communication at the University of Oregon.